The Measure Of A Father

I often chuckle when someone tells me, “you’re a great Father.”

Often, because the comment usually comes from those who really have very little clue whether I’m a good father, bad father or otherwise. I imagine they’re overly influenced by the sheer number of children we have in this house. They get to see almost nothing of my parenting skills. Of course I’m proud when people comment about how well behaved my children are. And they are. But they’re still young.

My children are 15, 10, 9, 6, 5 & 4. I appreciate the kind words about my dad skills, but those who, with the very best of intentions, say “you’re a great Father,” should check back in 20 years. In my opinion, the real measure of a “great Father” is a combination of how he conducts himself AND how his children turn out as adults. Bill Lublin, for example, is a great Father.

Today is the 33rd anniversary of the birth of Bill’s son, Hal. If just one of my sons turns out to be anything like Hal Lublin, I’ll be a very proud Father. He is kind, authentic, intelligent, creative and ridiculously funny. If any one of my sons conducts himself with the same degree of integrity that Hal Lublin does at age 33, perhaps then I’ll stop chuckling when people attempt to complement my parenting. I don’t know. Maybe, I’ll always chuckle.

I sure hope I get to find out. Happy Birthday, Hal. I’m honored to know you.

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3 comments on “The Measure Of A Father”

  1. Nicely written, Jeff. Happy Birthday Hal!

  2. Just saw this… Jeff, I have seen you in action as a Dad, and you ARE a great father!


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